MFF projects encourage public participation in coastal management

Location: Bangkok, Thailand. 25th Jul 2012

MFF aims to achieve long term solutions that contribute to regional and national efforts that ensure environment issues are mainstreamed in development planning and activities. Hence, bringing together governments, non-government entities and the private sector, local communities and civil society to address the key drivers behind environmental degradation has been the cornerstone of MFF vision and activities. This means that beyond superficially responding to symptoms or mitigating impacts from afar, MFF reaches across all levels to engage stakeholders with conservation on the ground.

MFF aims to achieve long term solutions that contribute to regional and national efforts that ensure environment issues are mainstreamed in development planning and activities. Hence, bringing  together governments, non-government entities and the private sector, local communities and civil society to address the key drivers behind environmental degradation has been the cornerstone of MFF vision and activities. This means that beyond superficially responding to symptoms or mitigating impacts from afar, MFF reaches across all levels to engage stakeholders with conservation on the ground.

 

MFF is working through projects that promote dialogue, collaboration, and participation among people institutions and governments. Most of these projects focus building awareness and understanding; motivating ecosystem stewardship and helping build sustainable livelihoods while also identifying sustainable sources of funding for coastal ecosystem conservation.

 

MFF - On the ground

 

  • Conserving and regenerating mangroves at Mithapur (India) -
    MFF successfully engaged the support of a large corporate partner by building its capacity for conservation and by developing an integrated management approach to coastal conservation. The project also established a school-based awareness campaign that reached 2,500 students in 25 rural schools. Management of mangrove nurseries created 466 days of employment for disadvantaged women in the project’s self-help groups.

  • Managing the Angke Kapuk wetland to conserve its natural resources (Indonesia) - Local partner Jakarta Green Monster provided a much cleaner living environment for the local community, and have involved learners in developing small recycling businesses. A notorious local “dirty corner” is now a cheerful and colourful village recycling centre, as well as a popular learning and recreation area for families.

  • Environmental awareness media project (Maldives) - The MFF Small Grants Facility supported three programmes aimed at disseminating information on the importance of mangroves through a popular radio station, DhiFM. It also supported a nationwide environmental awareness campaign through songs and posters. These programmes helped intensify existing environmental awareness efforts in the Maldives.

  • Conserving turtle rookeries on Mahé through improved public awareness and community involvement (Seychelles) - The project successfully encouraged local communities, individuals and businesses to take responsibility for their beaches. People were trained in monitoring techniques and developing a protocol for reporting any unusual activity, for example poaching, or emergencies, such as injured turtles or females laying eggs in areas where they would be at risk.

     

    For more examples of MFF projects with people at the core, visit the Grants page at www.mangrovesforthefuture.org.

     

ASF discusses project progress with GIF project manager Mahe c MFF Seychelles 2010

ASF discusses project progress with GIF project manager, Seychelles © MFF Seychelles , 2010

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