Supporting farmers in implementing the mangrove based polyculture of shrimp-crab - fish (spotted scat) and with Scirpus(ScirpuslittoralisSchrab) for aquaculture natural feed in TraVinh province

 
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Mangroves in Long Khanh Commune, Duyen Hai District, Tra Vin ... , Long Khanh Commune, Duyen Hai District, Tra Vinh, Vietnam © IUCN Vietnam

Objectives

The project aims to build up a pilot demonstration on productive poly-culture of shrimp – crab – spotted scat and planting Scirpus in farming pond at Long Khanh and Long Vinh communes Duyen Hai District – Tra Vinh.

Background

Mangrove-based extensive shrimp farming accounts for up to 80% of farming area in Duyen Hai district of TraVinh province. Many households who previously run industrial shrimp farms and failed have also changed into extensive shrimp farming. However the economic values from mangrove-based shrimp farms are not so high due to lack of technical knowledge and experience. 

Target beneficiaries

  • 10 households participate directly in the project and are supported in farming system design
  • 400 farmers are trained and shared information on models of shrimp-crab-spotted scat and planting Scirpus.
  • 200 farmers participate in communication workshop and site visit for experience learning

Outputs

  • 10 demonstration plots of shrimp-crab-spotted scat and plant Scirpus in farming ponds is built
  • Maintain mangrove – water surface ratio at 20-30% in farming ponds.
  • 20 training courses (at project site based on FFS method).
  • 10 communication workshops at commune
  • One site visit for experience learning for farmers
  • 100 copies of guidelines

Accomplishments and challenges

Improvements in income generated from a unit of area made local people enthusiastically take up the new model of aquaculture. 85% of the interviewed households expressed their willingness to continue to implement this model in future years.

The mangrove area was maintained (with the coverage of 20 to 30%) and cared for healthy growth. Some households actively planted more mangroves such as the households of Ngo Van Lac and Mai Van Hung. Mangrove reforestation has contributed greatly to the environmental protection in farming areas to adapt better to climate change.

The survey results showed that 68% of people were aware of the benefits of planting Scipus littoralis in shrimp ponds and up to 76% of local respondents agreed to plant Scipus littoralis in their shrimp ponds. When Scipus littoralis grow well in shrimp ponds, their roots provide habitats for some water creatures including snails and worms living and growing. These are a direct feed source for shrimp, crabs and fish raised in the ponds, helping them grow fast and consequently, contributing to increasing their yields.

The project provided job opportunities for both men and women: women got directly involved in managing farming ponds, partly engaged in the production process such as Scipus littoralis planting, crab harvesting and selling. Especially, the women were involved in the financial management of their families; two women were members of the project management board. Propaganda programmes, training courses, workshops and study tours were attended by women, accounting for 20-30% of the participants. Through propaganda programmes, workshops and training courses on scientific and technical transfer, gender issues were integrated into the project in order to avoid gender differences: both men and women were provided with opportunities to have access to scientific and technical applications in production; awareness of gender equality was raised among communities; men and women respected each other, shared and discussed their problems and jointly made all decisions in their families.

During the project, attention was always paid to the issue of climate change and especially, protection of mangrove ecosystems to adapt to climate change was a top priority. Through propaganda and training sessions as well as supervisions and inspections of the models, the project staff frequently and proactively discussed the issues of climate change with the locals to raise their awareness of the importance of forest and ecosystem protection in places where they live and do aquaculture. Consequently, the local people actively protected mangroves and maintained the existing forest area. In the meantime, some households planted more mangroves in their farming areas.

The project placed great emphasis on improving the livelihoods of the poor and near-poor households and also households of local ethnic minorities. Two households from the ethnic minority of Khmer and one near-poor household were part of the project building the demonstration model.

Contributions to cross-cutting themes

  • Climate change adaptation

Lessons Learned

It is very important to successfully implement the model based on the proper aquaculture process and techniques. One household did not achieve the target of productivity because they had not followed the instructions on hatching time from the technical staff. The hatching time lasting 50 days caused diseases for shrimp leading to damage to their yield.

Project Facts

Country

Location

Long Khanh and Long Vinh communes, Duyen Hai District, Tra Vinh Province, Vietnam

Topic

Duration

1st May 2014 to 30th Apr 2015

MFF Grant Amount

VND 379,250,000

Implementing Partner

TRA VINH AGRICULTURE AND AQUACULTURE EXTENSION CENTER.

Representatives Contact: Kim Huynh Khiem

Address: 109 Pham Ngu Lao, Phuong 1, Tra Vinh City.

Telephone: (84743) 384.0171

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